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Menges Tripawds

Two pups, six legs, zero problems!

Menges Tripawds

Sadie’s Story

June 26th, 2015 · 4 Comments · Uncategorized

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So after I adopted Lucky, Brandy and I agreed that someday we would get him a playmate.  Because Brandy was still in school, I agreed that we would get a second pup once she graduated in 2015 as a sort of graduation present.  Once that time came around, I started looking at local shelters for a nice young pup that got along well with Lucky.  Brandy personally wanted an American Cocker Spaniel, and I’ll be honest, they are not easy to find.  A few weeks before her graduation, we received a message on Facebook from Brandy’s aunt, more as a joke than anything else.  There was a three-legged Dachshund mix at the local SPCA.  She literally had the same coloring as Lucky, but instead of missing her back right leg like Lucky, she was missing her left front leg.

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I figured it wouldn’t hurt to arrange a meeting with her foster parent, Sara, just to see if she got along well with Lucky and me.  She was very skittish at first, and she even growled at Lucky the first time they met.  Here’s the funny part.  Once Lucky got close enough, he inspected her missing leg, and she responded by inspecting his missing leg.  After that, they were pretty much best pals.  I guess they found common ground.  Also, when we adopted her, her name wasn’t Sadie.  It was Brandi.  Once the shelter found out my wife’s name, they agreed that we should probably change the pup’s.  Brandy decided Sadie sounded pretty, so we settled on that.

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Sadie’s story is sadder because, unlike Lucky, we know what happened to her.  She was born about a year before I adopted her, and was brought in to the SPCA with about four of her siblings.  We honestly don’t know what her breed is because she looked different from her siblings who were all beagle mixes.  We call her a Dachshund mix because she’s very long and has a short, stumpy front leg.  Anyway, a little while after being brought to the shelter with her siblings, the kind people took them all for a walk.  Something spooked her, and she pulled off the leash and ran into the Pennsylvania woods.  She was gone for four months during one of the coldest PA winters on record.  If I were in the shoes of the shelter, I would have assumed she was dead.  After four months, the shelter received a call saying that the police were called to a property because a dog wouldn’t come out from under someone’s wood pile.  That dog was our little Sadie.  Sadly, she had gotten her leg caught in a game trap and had to pull it out, which partially amputated her front paw and exposed the bone.  According to the shelter, she recognized some of the volunteers and was in high spirits when they found her.  She had her leg amputated and was put into a foster home with Sara.  She loves Brandy, Lucky and I, but she’s still a little skeptical of strangers.  She will bark at someone until I pick her up and hand her to them.  That’s how she knows I trust them.  Once she knows I trust them, she usually does.  She loves picking play fights with Lucky that can go for minutes on end and are super entertaining to watch.  One of my favorite quirks is that because she is missing her front leg, her front is a lot lighter.  When she wants something from me, or when I say “Sit”, she will stand back on her haunches with her front paw in the air, and sometimes she’ll wave her front paw.  Cracks me up every time.

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She will stand like that for minutes if she is trying to get my attention or if she is in the car and wants to look out the window.  She’s my pretty little girl, and a phenomenal little sister to Lucky (even if she does outweigh him by a good ten pounds).

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Sadie and Lucky fighting for the fleece Steelers pillow… a nightly occurrence.
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Sadie won. Lucky is not amused.
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She does know how to share, though.

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This picture was taken immediately following Sadie’s adoption.  From left to right, I’m holding my parents’ Australian Cattle Dog, Blue.  My dad is holding Sadie.  Brandy is holding Lucky.

 

Until next time,

JD


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Lucky’s Story

June 19th, 2015 · 4 Comments · Uncategorized

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In April 2013, I returned home to my post at White Sands Missile Range, NM after nine months in one of the most hostile provinces in Afghanistan.  At this point my wife, Brandy, and I had been married almost two years, but because she was working on her doctorate, we had never lived together.  While deployed, I joked with her about how I was going to get a dog when I returned home since she was at school.  She actually thought it would be a good idea to ease my anxiety after the deployment.

After doing my homework on several shelters in the area, I decided to stop by the Animal Services Center of the Mesilla Valley in Las Cruces, NM.  At first I was largely considering getting a 6 month old border collie, but when they allowed me time with her, there was no chemistry.  As I walked back through the small dog section, I noticed one of the dogs mixed in with all the other terrier sized dogs was not jumping up at the side as I walked past.  I looked closer and realized he couldn’t jump up the side of the pen because he was missing one of his back legs.

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I had never met a three-legged dog before, so I asked for some time to meet him.  They called him Ace at the shelter and he was something of a celebrity because of his Tripawd status.  He had been with the shelter for over six months, and had had his back right leg amputated the previous December.  When I asked them why it had to be amputated, they said he had come in as a stray and that his back leg was mangled, but there was no discernible cause.  It is a mystery to us to this day.  Needless to say, there was an immediate chemistry between this 1 year old pup and I.  I was able to take him home with me that day.  After talking it over with Brandy, we decided his name should be Lucky, for obvious reasons.
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Lucky is an extremely active dog, but at the same time very very docile.  He is the friendliest dog I have ever met, and he’s still a celebrity whenever I take him anywhere.  I have had several friends and colleagues jokingly threaten to take him as their own.  He is one of my best friends in this world, and Brandy and I would be lost without him.  He is currently 3 years old.  While the shelter stated that he was a “Terrier Mix”, we’ve never been able to figure out exactly what kind.  We’ve deduced that there is probably some Rat Terrier in him due to his docile demeanor.  I personally think there’s a little Chihuahua, but don’t tell Brandy that, because she disagrees 😉

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Until next time,

JD

 

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Hello Tripawds!

June 14th, 2015 · 3 Comments · Uncategorized

Two pups, Six legs, Zero problems

Hey guys, this will just be a short post to begin.  My name is JD and my wife’s name is Brandy.  We will be co-authoring this blog.  We are extremely excited to be part of this blog community.  I am currently an officer in the U.S. Army and Brandy works in the field of science communication.  We’ve technically owned one of our two tripawds since March 2013, and we just recently got our second tripawd in April of this year.  I will definitely go into greater detail about our two pups later.  Long story short, our pups include Lucky, a 3 year old black brown terrier mix who is missing his back right leg.  Our newest addition is 1 year old Sadie, a black brown Dachshund mix who is missing her front left.  I’m happy to say that neither have been slowed down in the least by their amputations, and they are best friends.  Looking forward to further communication.  Thank you for the opportunity!

-JD & B

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